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Puno, Lake Titicaca and the Uros Islands

22 Oct

From Cuzco we took a direct overnight bus to Puno, which unfortunately arrived at around 4.30am. We had pre-booked the Quechuas backpackers hostel in Puno, so we took a taxi for 5 soles and arrived at what looked like a very closed hostel. After ringing the bell and waiting for what seemed like an eternity, the door finally opened and we were shown to a lovely room where we were instructed to just rest and check-in later. Feeling grateful and in need of some sleep we went straight to bed for a few hours.

The hostel turned out to be one of the best ones we stayed in during our trip. The owner was lovely and helpful, the price included breakfast and free tea/coffee all day and to top it all off, whereas some places would have charged us an extra night for the early check-in, Quechuas, gave the night and breakfast for free!

We planned to stay only 2 days in Puno, as the town itself is fairly small and there isn’t much to see outside of the lake. Also, as it’s a touristy place the food prices are quite high, although we were lucky enough to find Govinda, a set vegetarian lunch place for only 6 soles each.

There a few trips that you can do around Lake Titicaca, including the famous floating Uros Islands, Taquile Island and Amantani Island. We opted for the half day trip to the Uros, and in all fairness you don’t need more than half a day to see them.

I had done this tour back in 2008 and remember it as a fairly peaceful trip with not too many people around. It had had tourists but not hoards of them, and so I was looking forward to taking the trip again with my partner.

We discovered that you have 2 options to see the floating islands, the easy option is to book a tour for around 25 soles each, which includes all your transport and a guide. The second is to go to the port and buy a return ticket to the islands and pay the entry tax. Although, I am not sure as to how you would navigate from island to island if you wanted to.

For simplicity’s sake we took the tour. We were picked up at from the hostel at 8am and went to the dock to board our boat. Once everyone had arrived we headed off to the floating islands. The boat ride is around half an hour and the lake is so calm that you don’t feel like you are on water.

Lake Titicaca: on the way to the floating Uros islands

There are around 60 small islands in total, with 40 odd being located within easy reach of the tour boats. The people from Uros have adapted their way of life to cater for the tourists and a large part of their livelihood now comes from tourism. As a result the tour boats are evenly spread between the islands, with each one receiving 1 – 2 boats per day.

Lake Titicaca: approaching the floating Uros islands

Lake Titicaca: the floating Uros Islands

Each island has its own mini community with a leader and a few families. The women tend to make textiles and the men work on handicrafts and each island has its own little market of handmade goods.

Lake Titicaca: a community in the floating Uros islands

When you first arrive at your designated island you are greeted by the inhabitants and shown how they live, how the islands are formed, what they eat and how, at the markets, they exchange their goods such as fish for fruit and vegetables, which they are unable to grow. Although very much catered to tourists, the explanations are interesting and give you an insight to their heritage.

Lake Titicaca: floating Uros Island presentation

Once over you are invited to see inside their houses and even try on some clothes. You then have the option to pay 10 soles extra for a short ride in their reed boat to a main island. Alternatively, you can just get back on your boat as it has to go there anyway…

The main island I can only describe as hideous. It is almost looks like a floating commercial centre with small bars, restaurants and gift shops. It is totally out-of-place and must be new as I do not remember this from my last trip.

Unfortunately, the Uros islands are now far more tourism orientated than my last visit, so much so that each island seemed to have a boat located on its side. Although I understand the communities’ need for tourism I feel it is going too far and they are turning their pretty little islands and themselves into circus shows. A real shame as it used to be a lovely tranquil place….

Lake Titicaca: reed boat on calm waters

 
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Posted by on October 22, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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