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Returning from a Year of Travelling

07 Apr

So it’s now almost 2 months to the date since we arrived at Heathrow airport with our backpacks firmly in place following an almost 12 month round-the-world trip. The initial shock of arrival, made worse by the last week of our trip being spent on the beaches of Bali only to land in freezing UK temperatures, has started to wear off.

Our first 2 weeks back in the country were literally spent floating around the house and re-adjusting to the cold, something we have still not managed to accomplish. The following 2-3 weeks we ventured out to see friends, ex-colleagues and generally try to re-integrate back into society on this side of the planet. Having said that, we both agree that some things we will never be able to adjust back to.

The most shocking thing for me when we returned was the realisation of how much “stuff” I still owned. Prior to the trip we had undergone a massive clear out of our belongings, and because we were unsure of our intention upon our return we had boxed everything up ready to go. Opening boxes and discovering just how many items we still had was a revelation, especially as I always prided myself in being fairly minimalistic. With the feeling that my backpack was pretty much all I needed still firmly in my head, I decided to undergo a further clear out and was surprised at how easily I could “part” with items. I was able to easily discard things without the emotional attachments or what if scenarios, and as such the local charity was especially pleased to see us when we started hauling box after box into their shop.

Despite the reduction and now half-empty closets, it still took me almost 3 weeks to wear something from this new collection of mine. It felt strange to have such a choice of clothes, and let’s not forget shoes! Bit by bit I expanded my daily wear to include a couple of the items from the half empty wardrobe. However, despite the occasional use of other clothes there are many which still just sit there looking at me and I still feel slightly guilty about that.

The next big adjustment came with the inevitable food shop. Throughout our travels we had shopped on a daily and sometimes bi-weekly basis, depending on where we were staying and for how long, so thinking about purchasing food for longer than a few days took some getting used to. The mere thought of having a freezer and being able to batch cook with more than just a half broken pan and an actual sharp knife felt totally surreal.

As such the first 3 weeks we simply shopped for a couple of days at a time, slowly getting used to having such commodities and gradually expanding our choice of foods as well as amounts. 2 months on and we are now back to buying on a fortnightly basis, however we have not reverted back to the wasteful ways of the west.

Instead we plan what we will eat and buy accordingly, then with our “menu” firmly in place on the fridge we simply tick meals off as we go until we have eaten everything in store. Only then do we re-stock for food. Unfortunately, my mother does not see this as beneficial, but rather that I have been permanently scarred by budgeting and my travels, and therefore keeps trying to give me money so that “I can eat what I want, when I want”. I doubt she will ever see the point of our planning.

A key part of travelling is budgeting, and if you learn this, it will serve you well in the future. With my partner waiting for his work visa for New Zealand and me looking for work, something totally surreal in itself after not setting foot in an office for over a year, we have to manage what little funds we have left. So, until we have an income we are still living with a set budget and accounting for all costs, something we never did before in the UK and which has not been that difficult to do.

The transport issue hasn’t hit as hard as I thought it would. Not having had a car for nearly a year has not made us suddenly crave one. In fact, we are happier to walk around and use our natural form of free transport, known as legs. Alternatively, if we must go further afield then neighbouring villages, we take public transport, which is an adventure itself, or if available borrow a car.

One of the hardest things to get used to has to be the weather. If you are from the UK you will know what I mean. If not, then imagine grey skies, and this year in particular a very cold and long winter, and no sun. The hardest part is the lack of daily sunshine. Yes the tan is fading because of it, but that is not my main concern. The fact that day-in and day-out you never see and feel the sun on your skin has a rather depressive feel on the brain. You actually feel your body craving sunlight and slowing down as a direct response to the constant greyness, especially after almost 12 months in the sun.

The overwhelming challenge since we returned has to be resisting being sucked back in. Obviously travelling opens up your eyes to new things and ways of life, but as to how much it will impact you is dependent on you. If you do allow it to alter your perception then your challenge is to keep that perspective alive, even when you are the only one with it and there is nothing around you to reinforce it.

It is not a cliché but reality that travelling opens up your soul to the larger world around you. The hard part is keeping this openness when no-one around you understands it. As such, my advice would be, travel and see what you can. Absorb local cultures and let your views change, but don’t then store it away as just “experience” in life. Keep it alive in the little things you do and don’t lose your new found perspective.

 
3 Comments

Posted by on April 7, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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3 responses to “Returning from a Year of Travelling

  1. Miss Penny Black

    April 7, 2013 at 1:43 PM

    Wow, great post! My partner and I are one month into a 9 month trip and I’ve been wondering how I’ll feel on our return to Australia. We might not have the sun issues but I am already dreading unpacking all my boxes of crap when I get home.

    Looking forward to reading back through your archives:).

    http://www.herecomestheplanet.com
    🙂

     
    • shari

      April 7, 2013 at 6:15 PM

      Well at least you don’t have to worry about it for a while!

       
  2. Cathie

    January 24, 2014 at 9:24 PM

    love this story about coming back to the unreal world! We are leaving in a few days to become house sitters in Costa Rica for 4 months. Sold our home in June – bought an RV – been traveling around seeing our kids and the sites – and now, storing the RV and heading out for the next adventure. Thank you for you inspiriational site and insights! Via con Dios!

     

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